World Breastfeeding Week 2017

In 2016, the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) began the 15-year journey to achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by linking each of these goals to breastfeeding. But, WABA cannot achieve sustainable development without multi-level partnerships at all levels.

The World Breastfeeding Week’s 25th year in 2017 is about working together for the common good!

World Breastfeeding Week calls on advocates, activists, decision-makers, and celebrants to forge new and purposeful partnerships. WABA wants us to attract political support, media attention, participation of young people, and widen our pool of celebrants and supporters together.

To learn more about World Breastfeeding Week, or to post an event you’re hosting in honor of the week, please visit their website.

American Holistic Nurses Association Recognizes Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, CHT, AHNBC for 2017 Holistic Nurse of the Year

Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, CHT, AHN‐BC of Nashville, Tennessee was honored with the 2017 Holistic Nurse of the Year award at the 37th Annual American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) Conference in Rancho Mirage, California, June 5 – June 10th, 2017. The Holistic Nurse of the Year (HNY) award is intended to recognize AHNA members with outstanding innovation and/or a change in the field of holistic nursing. It highlights nurses who have been working in holistic nursing for several years and have demonstrated a commitment towards the Holistic Nursing’s core values.

About Debra

Debra Rose Wilson PhD, RN, AHN‐BC, CHT, of Nashville, Tennessee has been a member of AHNA since 2000, and has been providing guided imagery certification to thousands of nurses for over 20 years. Debra is no stranger to AHNA awards. In 2016 she was the recipient of the AHNA Service Award and early in her career, she twice received the Charlotte McGuire Scholarship Award. Outside of AHNA, Debra has been recognized locally and nationally including the 2016 Faculty Engaged Scholar Award from Tennessee State University and a Commendation from the United States Army for providing workshops and training for the Department of the Army, 4203rd USA Hospital Medical Unit in Conference.

Debra’s specialties in nursing include self‐care, stress management, connections between mind and illness, trauma, and inflammatory connections between mind and body. Currently, she is working towards her second PhD in quantum physics, in an effort to discover how to better empirically describe quantum energy and its influence on health. On top of her own education, Debra is also a nurse educator herself. She has been teaching PNI to psych students for over 12 years and has developed a free online learning program called Psych Pharm, a stressless method of learning psychotropic drugs and is working on turning it into a free app for nursing students. It currently boasts 90,000 users. Debra teaches her students from a holistic paradigm and is the driving force behind the development of programs such as the MSN in Holistic Nursing, and Pain Management Training with Hypnosis for the Trigeminal Pain Association.

Debra is a regular speaker, locally, nationally, and internationally, has been a keynote speaker several times, and has over 100 publications and many more presentations. Her publications and presentations include Caring for Patients with Mental Health Issues: Strategies for all Nurses, 2nd Edition, a peer reviewed book she co‐authored and authored a chapter on ENERGY in the Holistic Nursing: Handbook for Practice, 7th Edition.

Debra is very active not only in her career and publications, but also in her local, national, and international communities. The contributions to her local community include the Nashville Sexual Abuse Center; SHARE, a grief support group for those families who have lost a baby; and Breast Feeding Support. Internationally, she was invited to be a visiting scholar for the Botswana ‘I am Proud to be a Nurse’ Pin Project, where she spoke about holistic nursing, stress management and self‐care for nurses.

Nationally with AHNA, Debra was the Nurse Planner for the 2015 AHNA Annual Conference in Branson, MO, was a member on the 2016 Conference Committee, is a member of the current 2017 Conference Committee, and will be the Nurse Planner for the 2018 Conference Committee. She has also been a member of two branches of the AHNA’s Education Committee for several years: the Education Approval Committee since 2000 and the Program Approval Committee since 2007.

About AHNA

At its founding in 1981, the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) adopted as its primary mission the advancement of holistic healthcare by increasing awareness and promoting education as well as personal community‐building among nurses, other healthcare professionals and the public. This professional specialty nursing membership organization is becoming the definitive voice for holistic nursing for registered nurses and other holistic healthcare professionals around the world. Holistic nursing focuses on integrating traditional, complementary and integrative treatment opportunities to improve the physical, mental, emotional and relational health of the whole person.

AHNA delivers valuable resources, improves educational tools, and offers superior networking opportunities to a vibrant and expanding universe of healthcare professionals. AHNA currently services approximately 4,500 members through 130 local chapters/networks in the U.S. and abroad.

Holistic nursing is recognized by the American Nurses Association as an official nursing specialty with both a defined scope and standards of practice.

For additional information, contact:
JACOB WINGARD
Communications@ahna.org
800-278-2462

ICEA Certification FAQ

QUESTIONS CONCERNING ICEA’S NEW CERTIFICATION PROCESS

ICEA is thrilled to announce that the new certification process was officially launched on July 20, 2017.

ICEA is now your one-stop shop where you can get all of your maternal-child health certifications at an affordable price!

If you would like to view the general changes to each program, please visit our blog. If you are currently certified through ICEA, expect to see an email 90 days prior to your certification expiration with the correct fees listed. As always, you can contact info@icea.org with any questions.

How will the new process affect the membership I already have?
Because recertification and member renewal dates did not always line up, it was difficult for members and certificants to keep track of various expiration dates. To simplify the process, membership and certification are now bundled together and membership is granted with all certification phases.

If you have a current membership, then it is still valid until its expiration date. On your renewal date, you will be requested to pay a prorated dues fee to carry your membership through the end of your current certification cycle. Expect to see an email 90 days prior to your certification expiration with the correct fees listed. As always, you can contact info@icea.org with any questions.

If I have already enrolled in an ICEA certification program, is that enrollment still valid?
Yes, your enrollment is still valid and you do not need to do anything to switch to the new program.

If I enrolled prior to July 20, 2017, do I follow these new requirements or the requirements that I enrolled under?
Ideally, we would like for everyone to follow the new certification requirements as ICEA’s Board of Directors feel these are the requirements needed to ensure high-standard programs. However, if you enrolled prior to July 20, 2017, and cannot meet all of the new requirements, then you will only need to fulfill the requirements you enrolled under. Please contact the ICEA office for more specific information regarding the previous requirements.

The costs seem higher and different than when I enrolled, will I need to pay the difference?
The new fees are actually lower and more cost-effective. Under the old process, members paid an enrollment fee andannual membership fees. Because these fees were paid separately, the old processes seemed cheaper because it was broken up into numerous payments. During the transition period, prices reflected on the website for recertification are not necessarily equivalent to the fees that will be requested from you. Expect to see an email 90 days prior to your certification expiration with the correct fees listed. As always, you can contact info@icea.org with any questions.

I previously enrolled in the certification program, what do I need to do to switch over to the new streamlined process?
You do not need to do anything.

Will my current expiration date change with the new, streamlined process?
No, your enrollment and certification deadlines are still the same. If your membership has expired, then the ICEA office will contact you to make renewal arrangements.

GENERAL QUESTIONS

What sets ICEA’s certifications apart from other certifications in the childbirth education or the doula field?
ICEA is your one-stop shop where you can get all of your maternal-child health certifications at an affordable price.

We pride ourselves on the ability to offer the programs that are most widely and easily available to maternal-child health professionals around the world. Most importantly, we believe success is found in following our core values:

  • COMPASSION:We believe approaching maternity care with compassion and a nurturing spirit improves birth outcomes for all families.
  • COLLABORATION:We practice a culture of collaboration based on the knowledge that mindful engagement with diverse groups advances positive, family-centered maternity care.
  • CHOICE:We support freedom of choice by training professionals committed to empowering expectant families through informed decision making.

Do I have to be an ICEA member to become certified?
ICEA membership is automatically granted to all certification candidates that enroll in our programs, when they become certified through our exam, and in the recertification process. All certification candidates enrolling in our programs are given up to two years to complete the necessary requirements, and, therefore, are granted up to two years of ICEA membership.  Additionally, all certified childbirth educators and doulas passing an ICEA exam or those seeking recertification will be given three years of membership to accompany their credential. This membership will ensure that all ICEA childbirth educators and doulas have access to the latest news, education, and programs needed to support the families they serve.

Does ICEA offer financial assistance to certification applicants? 
There are no scholarships available at this time.  However, ICEA’s pricing structure is a reflection of our goal to improve birth outcomes for all families in the international community. All pricing is based on data provided by the World Bank based on Gross National Income (GNI).

Why are the prices for country categories B-D so much cheaper than category A?
ICEA’s membership pricing structure is a reflection of our goal to improve birth outcomes for all families in the international community. All prices are based on the World Bank data for Gross National Income (GNI). The dollar is worth different amounts in different countries, so ICEA prices are equitable depending on the location of the member. Find your country’s category here.

If I want to transfer my certification from another organization, which organizations’ certifications are accepted through the ICEA Experienced pathways?
To qualify to apply for the experienced certification pathway for any of the ICEA certification programs, you must be certified through Lamaze International or DONA International.  Other certification programs are currently being evaluated.

If I do not have a certification with another organization, but I have been serving in my maternal-child health field for several years, can I enroll in the experienced pathway?
In order to ensure high-standard programs, ICEA believes that you must have previously obtained a certification from a recognized program to enroll through an experienced pathway. Otherwise, you need to enroll through a traditional pathway and an ICEA workshop to ensure you are abiding by ICEA standards.

What can I do if there is not an ICEA Certification Workshop in my area?
If you are considering the childbirth educator or birth doula certifications, there are online workshop options. If you are considering the postpartum doula certification or do not wish to take an online workshop for the childbirth educator or birth doula certifications, then you may reach out to an ICEA Approved Trainer to see if they may consider bringing a workshop to your local area.

Where and when are the exams given?
ICEA exams are taken online at a public facility of your choice with a confirmed proctor. You also choose the day and time of your exam that best fits your schedule.

What are the requirements for a proctor?
Proctors cannot be a family member, friend, or fellow ICEA certification candidate. Many people request to use their employer or a librarian at a public library.

Can I take the exam in another language besides English?
ICEA offers its exams in English, Spanish, and Chinese (Mandarin). Please let the ICEA office know if you need a translated exam or if you need the exam in a different language than mentioned here.

What if I need to change or cancel my exam date?
You may change or cancel your exam up to 10 days prior to the scheduled exam date.  Please contact the ICEA office at info@icea.org to make the appropriate arrangements.

How will I receive my exam results?
All ICEA examinations are taken online, therefore, candidates will immediately know their results upon completion. Each candidate will also receive an email from the ICEA Office within 1-2 business days of completing the exam with further details and information.

Can I retake the exam if I do not pass it the first time?
In the event a candidate fails the exam, ICEA will send the candidate a new examination application via email to retake the test. These candidates will have up to one year in which to pass the examination. They may retake the examination as many times as necessary within one year of the first fail date, providing repeat guidelines are followed and ICEA membership is maintained. Examinations ruled invalid will be treated as failed examinations and the candidate will have one year to retake the examination per guidelines. Each subsequent exam will be charged a fee based on geographic location. Please contact the ICEA Office for more information at info@icea.org.

New Certification Process Has Launched

I am thrilled to announce that the new certification process has officially launched! Streamlining the process to better serve you has been our main priority since January’s Strategic Planning meeting, and the board and I are eager to offer these great new opportunities.

ICEA is now your one-stop shop where you can get all of your maternal-child health certifications at an affordable price!

Below are the general changes to each program. If you are currently certified through ICEA, specific changes related to what you owe will be sent in the coming weeks.

Changes for All ICEA Certification Programs

  • Membership is now included with all certification payments so you don’t have to pay ICEA several times in each certification cycle.
  • Membership and certification deadlines are now the same so it’s easier to remember when your certification is up for renewal.
  • We now offer more equitable pricing on a global scale so ICEA certificants can flourish in the international community.
  • You now get a 5% discount on all certification payments if you hold more than one ICEA certification so obtaining all your maternal-child health certifications through ICEA is more affordable.
  • You will now pay 40% less* for combined certification and membership so you save money. (*Slightly varies depending on current certification and phase of certification cycle.)
  • All forms and certification processes have been streamlined so the process is less confusing and complicated.

Changes to the Childbirth Educator Certification Program

  • Traditional Pathway: You must observe 3 births before you take the exam instead of 2.
  • Experienced Pathway: To qualify for this pathway, you must have been certified with ICEA or another recognized childbirth educator certification program within the last two years. Otherwise, you must enroll through the Traditional Pathway. Additionally, 6 position paper post-tests must be passed instead of 5.
  • Recertification: You no longer need to observe other classes, have your classes observed, observe births, or complete a self-evaluation.

Changes to the Birth Doula Certification Program

  • Exam: There is now an exam* for this certification to assure that ICEA is the GOLD standard of birth doula programs. (*If you enrolled in this program prior to July 20, 2017, you will still need to take the exam, but there will be no additional charge.)
  • Exam Application: You will now have two years from the date of enrollment to provide all documentation to take the exam and become certified.
  • Experienced Pathway: You no longer need to provide 2 letters of recommendation.

Changes to the Postpartum Doula Certification Program

  • Exam Application: A resource list is no longer necessary to apply for the exam.

If you have questions about any of these changes, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, the board, or staff. We are honored you chose ICEA as your certification body, and we’re excited about your participation in our streamlined certification process.

Please Note: During the transition period, prices reflected on the website for recertification are not necessarily equivalent to the fees that will be requested from you. Expect to see an email 90 days prior to your certification expiration with the correct fees listed. As always, you can contact info@icea.org with any questions.

The board and I are incredibly excited for this next step, and we are certain these programs will serve your needs. We look forward to working alongside you to improve birth outcomes for all families in the international community.

In your service,

Debra Tolson, RN, BSN, ICCE, IBCLC, CPST
ICEA President, 2017-2018

Present at the 2018 ICEA Conference

ICEA is excited to announce that we are now accepting abstract submissions for our 2018 Conference, April 19-21, in Louisville, Kentucky, USA!

The conference theme focuses on ICEA’s newly defined core values:

  • COMPASSION: We believe approaching maternity care with compassion and a nurturing spirit improves birth outcomes for all families.
  • COLLABORATION: We practice a culture of collaboration based on the knowledge that mindful engagement with diverse groups advances positive, family-centered maternity care.
  • CHOICE: We support freedom of choice by training professionals committed to empowering expectant families through informed decision making.

If you have an idea for a presentation centered around one or more of our core values, we’d love to hear it! We’re accepting submissions for concurrent sessions, hands-on skills stations, and poster sessions.

All abstracts must be submitted through the online system by 5:00 PM EST on September 15. Abstracts will then be reviewed by the ICEA Conference Committee. Share your expertise today!

If you have any questions about submitting your abstract, please contact the office.

Submit Your Abstract

New Certification Process Launches Next Week

Throughout March and April, we unveiled exciting changes on the way for ICEA, and all of them benefit you! So far, we’ve released our Strategic Map, revitalized member benefits, and our new website.

Most exciting of all, we gave you a sneak peek into our streamlined certification process. Now, it’s time to announce that that the new certification process will launch next week!

Once the new programs are unveiled, you can expect to see:

  • Certification bundled with member benefits
  • More equitable pricing on a global scale
  • A process that is straightforward and easy to enroll in
  • A more nurturing organization that will mentor students
  • Reduced pricing for certifications purchased after initial certification

ICEA is now your one-stop shop where you can get all of your maternal-child health certifications at an affordable price!

If you’re already certified with ICEA, then great changes are in store for you too. The new recertification process includes updated and simplified procedures making the process less of a headache. Plus, recertification fees will be more cost-effective, and reduced pricing will be offered on second and third recertifications.

Please Note: During the transition period, prices reflected on the website for recertification are not necessarily equivalent to the fees that will be requested from you. Expect to see an email 90 days prior to your certification expiration with the correct fees listed. As always, you can contact info@icea.org with any questions. 

The board and I are incredibly excited for this next step, and we are certain these programs will serve your needs. Stay tuned for the official launch next week.

In addition to the streamlined certification programs, you can expect many more important and exciting changes to ICEA. These will all be steadily rolled and include:

  • Revised handbook and bylaws
  • Updated scholarship, mentorship, and volunteer programs

If you have questions about any of these changes, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, the board, or staff. We are honored you chose ICEA as your certification body, and we look forward to your participation in our streamlined certification process.

In your service,

Debra Tolson, RN, BSN, ICCE, IBCLC, CPST
ICEA President, 2017-2018

Five Secrets of Teaching Better Breastfeeding Sessions

by Terriann Shell, BS, RN, IBCLC, CHES, ICCE, FILCA

I’ve always thought that once you know how to teach adults childbirth, you could teach any subject. While this may be true, I find that teaching breastfeeding is a sacred and special calling. We are preparing expectant parents for the first independent task we ask of their newborn infant. We are shaping that once-in-a-lifetime special period- the “golden hour” when they meet their new baby for the first time and help shape a life-long relationship and the parents don’t evenknow how special this is-yet! If we are giving our sweat and knowledge to expectant parents and their support people, we really want our information to be helpful! Here is where we can share what is working in our sessions and what we’ve tried that didn’t work.

1. Use Catchy titles (but not too cutsie)

No one wants to go to hear “breastfeeding basics” or “breastfeeding 101.” Start with a catchy title because you have to get people in the seats before they can hear your good information. You want the people to attend to then go out and spread the word since word-of-mouth will be your best seller with their expectant friends. Give them a meme to share on their Facebook page or on Instagram. A catchy title says your class will not be boring and continue to carry the catchy titles out in your class information segments. You want to let them know you are professional, but fun.

What ideas can you share that you found effective for increasing session attendance?

2. Make sure you are teaching the most up-to-date information.

If you are still teaching the same information and the same way as you were five years ago, you are probably coming off as stale and outdated to your parents and support people and word gets around. We can now talk about expressing colostrum prenatally, when appropriate, and the incredible value of skin-to-skin for at least the first hour birth. If you are teaching prenatal preparation of nipples before breastfeeding, taking baby off the breast after X number of minutes, encouraging drinking of a lot of fluid or avoiding specific types of food, using nipple ointments for prevention or treatment of nipple discomfort then you may need to update your information.

What breastfeeding information have you updated recently? What “old” advice are you still hearing?

3. Be Concise with your agenda.

How much can someone absorb at any one sitting? Now add pregnancy brain into the mix! Encouraging support people to attend with the expectant person would be wise because they will also be around mother, supporting her after they have the baby and they will most likely remember more than the pregnant brain will.

We need to do our part by now giving every single fact we know about lactation. I suggest you think of your top 3 objectives and leave it at that. You will be more effective! Of course, each of these three objective may include several subtopics. For my sessions, my simple outline is something like this:

  • Why breastfeed?
  • How milk is made and how it is moved
    1. Simple anatomy
    2. Simple physiology (positioning, latch, moving milk)
    3. How to tell baby is getting enough
  • Resources for breastfeeding help

Notice what is missing? No discussion of sore nipples, engorgement, or mastitis. Who would want to breastfeed if the discussion focuses on everything that can possibly go wrong? Would they even remember the “fix” for any of these? Probably not and if they get off to a good start, they hopefully not need any of this information. If they do need help, then they have the resources to find it.

I also suggest watching your spiel for telling your audience what we once though or taught since that is useless information now unless you are talking about poor advice they might hear from others. Also dig through your audio-visuals and getting rid of that VCR tapes (nothing says outdated as a VCR!).

Watch the resources you recommend or have available. Are they from a company that sells a product? Are they from a source that is compliant with the World Health Organization’s Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes?

What topics do you feel is important for expectant parents to know after your session? How long do you feel an introductory breastfeeding session should be?

This leads into the next suggestion:

4. Use a variety of audio-visuals!

This may include teaching in new styles like offering quizzes on an app or clips from excellent internet resources. For example, the short clip of Jane Morton teaching hand expression is priceless, yet freely available online and if you hand each attendee a “breast” stress ball, they can practice along with Jane’s, “press, compress, relax,” incorporating more interaction increasing retention. Use dolls, bunch of grapes (to illustrate the milk “factory”), model breasts, YouTube clips, DVDs or downloads, and examples from today’s actresses and pop stars. Let people try positioning with soft dolls or stuffed animals, give them resources to watch videos over and over, as needed, to reinforce what they’ve learned, and present the information in a few different modalities.

What are your favorite resources for sessions? How do you make your classes interactive?

5. Leave ‘em wanting more!

Two of the topics that is most requested but not covered in my sessions is employment and pumping milk. I cover hand expression when talking about keeping a good milk production. How much do you think the audience will remember when the time comes, if you cover the differences between breast pumps, when and how to pump, storing and thawing milk, and or how to go back to work and express milk? That is a whole class in itself! Again, this goes back to giving them resources for when they need that information. You might want to have them come back for this class when the time gets close.

What topics do you leave out of your sessions or think you don’t need to teach in an introductory session?

Finally, one suggestion for a different, but effective breastfeeding education session is to ask the audience what they came to learn when opening the session and doing introductions. Write the topics down and then check them off as teach each topics on the list, throwing in essential information that is on your outline. This way everyone gets what they came for.

What other suggestion do you have for a quick class or for an how-to class on breastfeeding?

Terriann Shell has been teaching childbirth education as an ICCE through ICEA, since 2003 and has been an IBCLC since 1988. She holds a Bachelor in Health Science with a focus on health education and a minor in education. She is also a Certified Health Education Specialist and a Registered Nurse. Terriann moved from one of the smallest states, Delaware, to the largest, Alaska 20 years ago to run sled dogs and raise kids. She lives in Big Lake, Alaska with her family of 7 now-adult children and 11 grandchildren. She works at 2 hospitals doing lactation rounds and teaching childbirth and all the related classes. She served twice on the Board of the International Childbirth Education Association and also serve on the International Lactation Consultant Association.